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Basalts and Ice Age Floods of Grant Co, Washington

Basalts and Ice Age Floods of Grant Co, Washington
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It’s fairly quiet now, but central Washington has a tumultuous past. The past scarred its landscape multiple times. Last weekend, I took a field trip of the Geology of Grant County, Washington. It painted a picture of numerous, massive volcanic eruptions burying entire ecosystems with basalt rock and fire; and multiple episodes of equally massive ice age floods, spreading enormous walls of water over the region, carving through the newly-laid rock, drowning a multi-state area underneath a huge lake.

And that’s just what we covered on the middle day of the tour.

Below are some photographs of the field trip, led by geoscientist Mark Amara, organized by Association of Women Geoscientist – Pacific Northwest Chapter board members Theresa Burton and Marcia Knadle, with geological explanations.

Wanapum Basalts: Volcanoes

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Wanapum Basalts by Shari Maria Silverman is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Unported License.The lava that formed these basalts flowed from a vent in Idaho westward into Washington between 15.6 and 14.5 million years ago. They were in a middle of a series of lava flows, which occurred between 17.5 and 6 million years ago (Bjornstad et al. 1997:211, Fig. 2). This photo was taken by Banks Lake. The lava that formed these basalts flowed from a vent in Idaho westward into Washington between 15.6 and 14.5 million years ago. They were in a middle of a series of lava flows, which occurred between 17.5 and 6 million years ago (Bjornstad et al. 1997:211, Fig. 2). This photo was taken by Banks Lake.

Dry Lake: Ice Age Floods

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Dry Lake by Shari Maria Silverman is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Unported License.When they flowed over basalt rock 14,000 years ago, these falls dwarfed Niagara. They spanned 3.5 miles and plummeted 350 feet. The water may have been 300 feet deep before cascading over the cliffs. The water originated from an ice dam break, which released glacial Lake Missoula to pour over central Washington. The gargantuan glacial river carried huge icebergs and boulders, as as sands, mud, and gravel. All these scoured the landscape (Amara and Neff 2008). When they flowed over basalt rock 14,000 years ago, these falls dwarfed Niagara. They spanned 3.5 miles and plummeted 350 feet. The water may have been 300 feet deep before cascading over the cliffs. The water originated from an ice dam break, which released glacial Lake Missoula to pour over central Washington. The gargantuan glacial river carried huge icebergs and boulders, as as sands, mud, and gravel. All these scoured the landscape (Amara and Neff 2008).

Erratic on Steamboat Rock: Ice Age Floods

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Erratic on Steamboat Rock by Shari Maria Silverman is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Unported License.This is a crumpled, granite boulder on top of Steamboat Rock. It probably landed here during one of the great floods from glacial Lake Missoula began to peter out, stranding an iceberg. As the iceberg melted, it settled here. These foreign rocks are called erratics. Some come from as far away as Canada and exhibit features of Rocky Mountain granites (Amara and Neff 2008:11-12, 21). This is a crumpled, granite boulder on top of Steamboat Rock. It probably landed here during one of the great floods from glacial Lake Missoula began to peter out, stranding an iceberg. As the iceberg melted, it settled here. These foreign rocks are called erratics. Some come from as far away as Canada and exhibit features of Rocky Mountain granites (Amara and Neff 2008:11-12, 21).

Two Erratics on Steamboat Rock: Ice Age Floods

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Two Erratics on Steamboat Rock by Shari Maria Silverman is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Unported License.Erratics dot the entire top of Steamboat Rock. However, they're pretty far away from each other. This is a view from one granite erratic looking northish to another one. Erratics dot the entire top of Steamboat Rock. However, they’re pretty far away from each other. This is a view from one granite erratic looking northish to another one.

East – West Coulee on Steamboat Rock: Ice Age Floods

According to the Ice Age Institute, a coulee is defined as follows:

“A long, dry, steep-walled, trench-like gorge or valley representing an abandoned river channel. In south central Washington, the term coulee is mostly used for an abandoned ice-age flood channel,” (Ice Age Flood Institute 2002-2011). Coulees formed throughout central Washington and neighboring areas as the huge floods from glacial Lake Missoula poured from the narrow opening of the broken Ice Dam along the Clark Fork River. Some were large, like the ones formed by the Dry Falls photograph. Others were smaller, such as the East – West Coulee on top of Steamboat Rock.

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East – West Coulee on Steamboat Rock by Shari Maria Silverman is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Unported License.A trail connecting the top and the bottom of Steamboat Rock briefly runs through the East - West Coulee near its mouth. The mouth appears to be a hanging valley, through which streams fall to depths below during spring runoff. The sage grows tall and abundant here compared to many other parts of Steamboat Rock. A trail connecting the top and the bottom of Steamboat Rock briefly runs through the East – West Coulee near its mouth. The mouth appears to be a hanging valley, through which streams fall to depths below during spring runoff. The sage grows tall and abundant here compared to many other parts of Steamboat Rock.

Playa on Steamboat Rock: Ice Age Floods

The tall grasses growing in this shallow depression may indicate that this spot on top of Steamboat Rock may be a playa. A playa is a "dry lake basin found in a desert," (Chernicoff and Venkatakrishnan 1995:G-12). When an iceberg was stranded on top of Steamboat Rock during a receding flood, its meltwater could have formed a shallow lake.

The tall grasses growing in this shallow depression may indicate that this spot on top of Steamboat Rock may be a playa. A playa is a “dry lake basin found in a desert,” (Chernicoff and Venkatakrishnan 1995:G-12). When an iceberg was stranded on top of Steamboat Rock during a receding flood, its meltwater could have formed a shallow lake (Amara 2013).

Link to Part Two of Field Trip

Basalt Monocline and Ice-age Grand Coulee

References

Amara, Mark S.
2013 My (Shari Silverman’s) field notes taken during a geological field trip (April 13, 2013) that Mark Amara led. They are field notes. They capture general items said, but I can only write so fast while taking pictures, so take them with that note.

Amara, Mark S. and George E. Neff
2008 Banks Lake to Soap Lake. In Geologic Road Trips in Grant County, Washington. Moses Lake Museum and Art Center, Moses Lake, Washington.

Bjornstad, Bruce N., R. Scott Babcock, and George V. Last
2007 Flood Basalts and Ice Age Floods: Repeated Late Cenozoic Cataclysms of Southeastern Washington. In Floods, Faults, and Fire: Geological Field trips in Washington State and Southwest British Columbia, Stilling, Pete and David S. Tucker, editors. In The Geological Society of America: Field Guide 9, 2007. The Geological Society of America, Inc., Boulder, Colorado.

Chernicoff, Stanley and Ramesh Venkatakrishnan
1995 Glossary. In Geology. Worth Publishers, New York, New York.

Ice Age Floods Institute
2002-2011 Glossary of Technical Terms Related to the Ice Age Floods. Within Ice Age Floods Institute website. Electronic document, http://www.iceagefloodsinstitute.org/glossary.html, accessed April 21, 2013.

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Basalts and Ice Age Floods of Grant County, Washington by Shari Maria Silverman is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Unported License.


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12 Comments

  1. Thanks for the informative descriptions of features I’ve navigated during fishing trips in the area. I’m a former resident of Walla Walla – I love the channeled scablands!

    • You bet! It’s a pretty spectacular environment.

  2. Shari,
    If you like geologic guidebooks of the Ice Age floods I would recommend two new guidebooks (On the Trail of the Ice Age Floods) written by yours truly. You can view these at: wwwBruceBjornstad.com.
    Bruce

    • Thanks Bruce! I have mid-Columbia On the Trail of the Ice Age Floods. It’s one of my favorite books on the subject. The maps with relief, diagrams, photos and descriptions are really helpful and easy to read. I can’t wait to visit all the places it features! I recently checked out your website: http://www.brucebjornstad.com/. Great photos and resource! I definitely want to check out the northern Idaho version of On the Trail of the Ice Age floods. I hope to visit Sandpoint in the near future, plus I lived in Moscow for several years, so that area is near and dear to me.

  3. Shari, a couple buddies and I had planned to go on that FOP trip, but you know how plans for FUN weekends can get squashed! Only one guy attended, and he had a great time.

    We’re more into the Death Valley scene, hunting up old mining cabins and mines, shooting at targets of opportunity, and extended campfire discussions.

    • Field trip of one. I guess it could be tailored, eh? Old mine cabins and mines are really neat. Unfortunately, as an archaeologist, my main work at mines was digging privies. The old buildings surrounding them and the smaller mines and camps we recorded were pretty neat though.

  4. Great field trip report Shari! I got to your site from a Linkedin message. Makes me want to hop in the car and see the sights (great pictures!) for myself. Bob

    • Thank you for the kind words! If you do hop in your car and head out there, the tour lead (Mark Amara) co-wrote a geology field guide book to the area. It is:

      Amara, Mark S., and George E. Neff
      2008 (fourth edition) Geologic Road Trips in Grant County, Washington. Moses Lake Museum and Art Center, Moses Lake, Washington.

  5. I live in Central California, and have been following and hoping to make a field trip by the Friends of the Pleistocene. Here’s a link to their 2012 Lake Tahoe field trip. And no drooling!
    http://funnel.sfsu.edu/fop/Tahoe_2012/FOP_downloads.html

    • The guidebook is really great. That must of taken a lot of work to put together. Fantastic! I have to say though, the songbook is downright awesome!

  6. Great field trip! I spent a early-spring week near Spokane investigating some nearby landfills groundwater conditions, back in ’82. Saw enough that I’d like to take a field trip just like this one! Bucket list entry #237.

    • Thanks for your comment! That landfill groundwater field trip sounds interesting. I never thought about that (something new to worry about). We actually had a pre-field trip after dinner the night before on groundwater contamination, the solution being implemented, and how it works (it is working well – carbon filter pads underneath the houses for TCEs). When you decide to take another field trip, there are a lot in the Pacific NW and Rockies to choose from. Mine was with the AWG (Association of Women Geoscientists – Pacific NW chapter link: http://www.awg-ps.org/), but also through the Northwest Geological Society, which lists other groups’ trips on their site too (http://www.scn.org/tech/nwgs/home2.htm), and the Tobacco Root Geological Society (on MY bucket list – http://www.trgs.org/).

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